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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
morning, i'm pam cook. steve is here with the weather. and what is it going to be like today steven? how is your voice? >> struggling a little bit. it will be all right there. thank you. we do have mostly cloudy conditions. it looks like a little bit of light rain is done. it's in southern california now. temperatures today partly sunny and cloudy with low 60s. >>> steve, good morning. the traffic here on interstate 880 looking pretty good. no major problems if you are driving through. also the morning commute looks good on westbound interstate 80 getting out to the mccarthur maze let's go back to the desk. >>> thank you. topping our news this morning an abduction attempt has parents and students on edge. noelle walker is outside sudder elementary school where a man tried to lure a young boy. >> reporter: this is a goodly is in what a child is supposed to do under these circumstances. the boy told the man he didn't know him and walked away from him. the suspect is described as a caucasian man with gray hair and facial stubble. he was driving a light blue late model '70 era car. the man w
book, the focus is on polaroid's founder, edward land. he left a lasting impression. even steve jobs drew inspiration from his invention. >> just a touch a button and it has to the picture. >> it was miraculous. you watched the picture come out in front of you while it process itself. it is still very strange. when i should these things, they think it is the world's best party trick. it got into people's heads in an extraordinary way. i'm the author of "the story of polaroid." edward land is the founder of polaroid and the founder of this photography. he is a drop out of harvard. he had attention which turned out to have lots of application. andsight's, gunsights, after 50 years they moved into instant photography. this blossomed in the 50's and sixties and exploded in popularity in the 1970's. people were shooting a billion polaroid pictures a year. >> we are still a long way of the realization of a concept of a camera that would be like a telephone. something that you could use all the long. >> he was a larger-than-life character. he had happened -- he had a habit of turning the sh
on this endorsement? >> oh, steve, you know -- i know -- >> i have to ask that question. i mean, come on. i mean, you're sitting here together. everybody in town is talking about it already. and it's taking place. >> you know, steve, i've got to tell you. you guys in the press are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago. >> right. >> and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> yeah. and i, as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state, so i'm out of politics, and i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> boy. you know, they have -- if we ever decide to leave this hallowed ground, i think they have the chemistry together to maybe host "morning joe." >> all right. >> much the same chemistry. >> much the same chemistry. look at that. just crackling. come on, mika, that's force. >> that was forced, and that's what i was sort of uncomfortable with. it's sort of obvious. but i guess -- you know, i like them both very much. but is he doing this with everyone else? >> bing crosby and bob hope, they are not. i mean, come on. >> well, they didn't -- >> other people
is steve chat ty, a roofer. he says he and his three other family members are living in a rented basement and for the time being, that's the best they can do, and they are grateful for that. when they talk about tent city, they say without it they couldn't have survived. here's what he said. >> this place is basically the best thing that ever happened to us after the storm. they been here since day one. they help everybody in the community, from food, drinks, down to diapers, and you name it. people relied on this place after the hurricane. >> now there is concern this snowstorm expected to arrive in a few hours could be difficult to cope with, especially here with these very fragile tents, and late not forget, winter continues for many more months. >> shepard: yes, it does, david lee, thanks for the work. look at this video crews in northeast massachusetts. icicles forming on their go. they have to watch where they step because water turns to ice quickly. here's how the arctic air swept over the united states last weekend. now freezing rain could be on the way for parts of the south. you
quick here. if you're a fan of comedy, you have to love steve harvey. a great new talk show on doing well and he just had a show celebrating his 56th birthday. as part of that show, they had a man call in who was instrumental in his early career when he was -- 30 years ago as a struggling carpet cleaner in florida. this guy and his wife gave him the money to launch steve's career. take a look at what happened when the guy called in to steve's show. >> i was 26 years old, man. i was struggling. i didn't have nothing, and these people owned a furniture store, and man, i ran up a bill like $11,000 just trying to travel and make it. and they helped me out. hey, man, i got money now, rich. >> everyone starts somewhere and never forget the people that helped get you where you are. really cool to see that. >> the good people never forget where they came from. >> amen. >>> britney spears, you know she and jason broke up last week and she broke up with the "x factor" and now has a huge deal in las vegas. well, she was seen without her engagement ring on monday, replacing that $90,000 ring wit
to their senses. we'll see. steve and hillary shlton, senior vice president for policy and advocacy at the naacp. when you first heard about this, what did it smell like to you? what was your sense of why people would be doing this kind of thing? breaking up the states by electoral college so that the rural states would have more clout. what did you smell? >> it seemed like a real fraudulent approach to try to undercut the process. at a time when we should be moving as a nation to make sure we're more democratic in the process so more americans can participate, to make sure that the outcome of our elections are consistent with the popular decisions made by those going to the polls. we have this move to undercut all of that. it's a big problem and it really stinks in so many ways. >> that's what i think. just talking about the state i grew up, in pennsylvania, where you have a large minority population in philadelphia. it's not all black, it's half and half. but the fact is, that's where the democratic race is. and you've got an 85% turn out for president obama. basically, all of those votes woul
join me in welcoming steve. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of you. i think we're going to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i am a special forces officer by profession. so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do or did. it'll let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published. a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows , the guerrilla in history by robert aspirate. that book from 1975 until now really has been the sort of a benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that is a long time for a book tour keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think his book is being replaced not. max has done that. with this book which is on sale outside, invisible armies, he, i think, has set the new benchmark for the subject area. his book is very, very comprehensive. it is somewhat chronological, but not entirely. it is somewhat regional, but not entirely, and it is som
. >>> the dow this morning at a five-year high. the s&p 500 flirting with 1,500. steve is managing director at webb bush securities. steve, great to have you with us. >> good morning. >> i've been hearing in the marketplaces that the volatility index is so low, that people can remain confident in staying long, because they can buy cheap protection. i'm wondering what your take is on these market highs here. >> well, certainly that's a contributing factor. the cost of protection is very, very low. but i think the biggest factor is we essentially have zero interest rates, and essentially have very expansionary monetary policies virtually worldwide in developed markets. this is providing a tremendous floor underneath risk to assets and will continue to do so as long as these policies remain in place. >> what do you make of the components that are pushing the markets to these highs? i mean, our previous guest making a point that midcaps, smallcaps trading close to record highs. we're making this move without a big market leader in apple. >> well, the most risky assets are doing the best. the sm
of that with mobile, if you've noticed, overnight. steve, you're with us, as well. and i didn't know you were going to do this. you've been getting in on the technology research. >> sure. i've always been what i consider to be a professional user. i'm not an expert, but i -- >> a user of -- >> of tech. technology. i filled that in. maybe the viewers at home thought what comes after that. i got a demonstration last night as i've heard others have of the new blackberry 10. i'm not giving you a recommendation on this thing. i saw the keyboard that was demonstrated by a high level blackberry executive and then i used it myself. it was very, very good. i have been opposed to use the virtual keyboard. i've tried the iphone. i didn't like it very much. this was very, very good, very usable, intuitive, and the browser was very, very fast. >> i agree. >> you were given a demo, but you came at it in two bits, right? >> i got a demo and what i loved about it was the keyboard. what i heard last night is yes, the blackberry 10 is coming out at the end of the month, but soon after, we'll have a blackberry 11 but
. standing by us at cme in chicago. steve liesman is going to be in davos, joining us, where he's been -- he had to go to switzerland to figure out the blackberry 10. jim your-you've got the numbers for us? >> no, i don't have the numbers. i'll give you the market reaction. >> honestly? >> all right we're going to put them up at the bottom of the screen. that's going well, so we don't have -- we don't have rick santelliish- >> i thought rick was going to give the numbers. >> rick santelli would normally give the numbers. >> wow. 330. >> 330 is initial jobless claims. >> that's huge. >> yeah, that's a good number. okay and this is interesting, in that over the last -- >> that's amazing. >> we've had several different numbers that weren't that good. so this is a big thing. but, the question we have to ask your offs is, the chairman said he wants to see substantial gains in the labor market before they're going to take the foot off the pedal. so this isn't enough to bring us there yet. but this is not a bad numbers. now you take into affect in asia we have stock market tailwinds, the fact they'
for this next team. >> brown: what do you think? >> i would agree, i would agree with what steve said. in terms of the middle east, however, i would say this. we'll have one more chance. i believe that. one more chance to make an effort to break through between the israelis and the palestinians but if we can only do it if we're engaged and we have all of the major parties in the world engaged in our side and then if there is an agreement perhaps detach this signing of the agreement, the conclusion of the agreement from its implementation that by gaining times for the parties and both sides-- palestinians and israelis-- to deal with their own internal dissidents. >> brown: it doesn't otherwise feel like there's another chance but you think there is? >> well, if there isn't then it's the end of the road for peace and the prospects both for the israelis and the palestinians are extremely grim. >> brown: all right, well, that's a bad note to end on, i guess, but we'll look for the next four years. zbigniew brzezinski, stephen hadley, thank you both very much. >> ifill: and we return to the decision
we have steve jobs' widow happening out with gabby giffords pac. finally the gun control side has money. >> the risk of congressional inaction -- just one moment -- >> every day people see us on this show, martin, and they say how wonderful it is that the martin bashir show is focusing on this issue. toure's point is exactly right. if you care about this issue, tell us you care about it by writing a check to one of the great organizations, the mayors group, there's about half a dozen groups that are doing important work. i intend to write a check for them and everybody watching who is interested and concerned about protecting our children and protecting your families and protecting your communities, you have to support these organizations that are doing important work. >> and your original point is absolutely right. the martin bashir point is wonderful. >> thank you. >> yes. >> but the risk of congressional action has prompted some mayors to start taking action. michael nutter of philadelphia, rahm emanuel of chicago. starting a devestment drive against gun makers. can i ask you,
and steve liesman apparently doesn't sleep on planes. >> how do you know she was saying, no, it's not me. it's not me. a bodyguard? >> she was fake iing an accent. >> she had the accent. >> faking. the trick is you can't get there from here, davos. right? >> it's a little complicated. the better way is take the private plane and land in zurich, take the helicopter, about four grand. that has the way the real folks do it. >> is that the "squawk box" helicopter in the back, behind you? >> oh, my god. coming in. >> we'll get you a helicopter. we'll get you a helicopter. >> we have a lot more to come an talk to you at the top of the hour. >>> when we come back, we'll go inside the golden afternoons. what would ronald mcdonald say about the start of business. reaction to numbers as soon as they hit the tape. davos myome. there. i said it. they don't have pictures of my kids. they don't have my yoga mat. and still, i feel at home. could it be the flat screen tv? the not so mini fridge? ♪ the different free dinner almost every weeknight? or maybe, it's all of the above. and all the rest. am i hom
in the last decade, really. >> yeah, i don't want to out him, but steve is four rows back, and he remembers, i'm sure, the disappointment when the bill failed. your predecessor was one of the point persons on it and had to sit in the cabin by himself for the weekend after it failed he was so discurnlgedded, but it's -- discouraged, but it's a big deal and affects the whole country. >> right. >> i'm hopeful we make progress. last immigration question. you worked with the mexico government, and one that is based on risk segmentation and the latest technology. please update us on how that's going. >> it's going well. you know, mexico is one of the leading trading partners, and quite frankly, we need a port infrastructure that allows goods and commerce to flow smoothly through. we're working on projects like preinspections so trying to take pressure off the physical border and do things before goods get there, working with mexico on trusted shipper and trusted traveler programs. we're working on doing risk-based analysis of cargo before it even arrives at a port of entry so i think that border, wh
million. of it only has ten million in assets. steve jobs worked for atari in the 19 70s. martha: what happened to him after that. bill: he did all right. martha: let's go to the national cathedral. we have a nice shot of the president, mrs. obama, mrs. biden and joe biden in the front row of the national cathedral. the prayer service is historically, traditionally the closing ceremony of the inaugural festivities and that is underway right now. bill: after a late night last night back at it today. we will watch that ceremony. make it a terrific day. stay warm in you're out in the arctic chill. we'll see you tomorrow, everybody. martha: buy everybody, see you tomorrow. jon: right now brand-new stories and breaking news. the threat is real for millions of americans treacherous road conditions, frigid temperatures, and now a new winter storm looming. what you need to know before heading out. plus a common household painkiller now linked to eye problems. what a new study says about a drug in your medicine cabinet that might increase the risk of going blind. and this boat does go over the
profits of the wireless industry concerns about this post steve jobs era. >> i think there may have been a little bit of drop back in the vision. tim cook has been running this company operational for many years. the company has been so strong in the past. monster revenue number, monster revenue cap. i do think that you cannot expect each incremental innovation to be something that is simply stunning. lori: paul, walking us to apples it is earnings report. thanks again. you want to keep it here for complete earnings. sandra smith is on after the bell at 4:00 p.m. eastern. secretary of state hillary clinton defending the administration's response to the benghazi attacks. lou dobbs weighs in just ahead. melissa: we are hitting the road with the american trucking association. ♪ the boys use capital one venture miles for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any f
,000 shares of apple for $7.47 each. they were given to him virtually by steve jobs himself. he paid 444 -- $445,000 for the shares that are worth nearly 30 million dollars. you want to go that with chris? do you think that's great? >> a great gift. i don't see anything wrong with it; right? what's wrong with it? it was a gift. stuart: it's al gore. >> and that's what makes it wrong? stuart: yes. >> you want me to comment on al gore getting a gift of shares and you don't want me to comment on raising the debt ceiling? kicking the can down the road once again? this show kicks the can down the road three years later we are together. i think we talked about the debt ceiling three years ago? stuart: we did. what do you think about this gift? what do you think, accountant? tracy: i think the irs is doing a happy dance, they've got big tax collections on it. >> as long as he pays taxes on it, i don't have a problem. >> save me. charles: all i can do is echo you, i just have a big problem with al gore. stuart: thank you very much. tracy: this is why charles and i are still on the show and chris
confident than last year. we've also got the survey that steve leesman came up with, the phrase i like, precarious stability. this is the first time, as he puts it, that we're meeting in davos without an imminent crisis upon us. we know the impact of the ecb's otr suggestions. we know the money that other central banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "wo
the late, great famous crocodile-wrestling naturalist steve irwin would have hesitated to sit down at a table for an hour and a half with the vice president, but at the end of that session, we knew which of those men had a better political character and which of those men was a better advocate for his cause. [applause] so i am, i'm absolutely certain that whatever is the solution and the answer to the right's political predicament over the next few years, paul ryan will be part of that answer and solution. he is a great friend of nr, a great advocate of our cause. please, ladies and gentlemen, welcome paul ryan. [applause] >> that was pretty good. i'll take you bow hunting someday. [laughter] hey, thanks, everybody. [applause] that's great. thanks so much. appreciate it. well, i can say about that introduction, that was the, um, most recent introduction i've ever received. [laughter] thanks, rich, i appreciate it. you know, i'm happy to see so many friends here in the audience. i just see a lot of familiar faces. and i'm honored to speak to so many distinguished guests. you know, y
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)